Type of Screening

Recommendation

Abdominal aortic aneurysm

For men 65 to 75 who have ever smoked, have screening one time to look for an abnormally large blood vessel (aneurysm) in your abdomen. For men 50 and older, if your mother, father, brother, or sister has or had an aortic aneurysm, have screening one time to look for an abnormally large blood vessel (aneurysm) in your abdomen.

Blood cholesterol

Check once at age 20 or at your first visit; check every 5 years starting at age 45 (for women) or 35 (for men).

Blood pressure

Check at each office visit.

Breast cancer

We offer mammograms at least every 2 years for women between 40 and 49. We strongly encourage women to have a mammogram every 2 years between ages 50 and 69. After age 70, we encourage you to make a personal decision in collaboration with your doctor about having a mammogram. Talk to your personal doctor about whether or not you need to be screened. Contact your doctor immediately if you find a lump in your breast.

Cervical cancer

For women, have a Pap test every 3 years starting at age 21, or 3 years after first sexual intercourse, whichever comes first. Beginning at age 30, have a Pap and human papillomavirus (HPV) test every 3 years up to age 65.

Colorectal cancer

Between ages 50 and 75, have a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) once a year, a FIT once a year plus a flexible sigmoidoscopy every 10 years, or a colonoscopy every 10 years. If you are older than age 75, talk with your doctor about colorectal cancer screening.

Diabetes (type 2)

Check every 5 years starting at age 45.

Oral cancer

Your doctor will let you know if you need additional tests.

Osteoporosis

Once at age 65 for women or 70 for men, or as recommended by your doctor.

Prostate cancer

For men, discuss the benefits and risks of prostate cancer screening with your doctor starting at age 50 until age 70.

Prenatal

During pregnancy, your medical team may recommend a variety of screening tests to make sure you are healthy and that your baby is developing properly. Take all the tests recommended by your medical team. Learn more about what to expect during pregnancy, labor, childbirth, and caring for your newborn.

Rubella

Women planning to get pregnant should get screened for rubella (German measles). If you do not show evidence of immunity, get immunized at least 3 months before you get pregnant. Exposure to rubella after you get pregnant may cause deafness, cataracts, or other serious damage to your developing baby.

Skin cancer

Your doctor will let you know if you need additional tests.

Vision and hearing

Adults age 65 and older, have your vision and hearing checked if you or others notice changes in your reading, driving, or hearing.

Additional tests

Your doctor will let you know if you need additional tests for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, depression, osteoporosis, or hepatitis C.